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Quote of the Day - Reform is China's second revolution. - Deng Xiaoping
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Lawyer 2 Lawyer Internet Radio Inspects China

The term, "Made in China" has come under a lot of scrutiny as of late. The latest worldwide toy recall has created huge image problems for Chinese-manufactured goods.

Today on Lawyer 2 Lawyer, we discuss the toy recall, the effect of the recall on the global economy and the fate of global outsourcing.  Please join me and my fellow Law.com blogger and co-host Robert Ambrogi as we welcome Professor Peter Dean, from Hong Kong Polytechnic University School of Design and a former US toy industry executive and Arthur Kroeber, managing director and head of research at Dragonomics out of Beijing, to discuss this hot topic.



Podcast 

Printer friendly page Permalink Email to a friend Posted by J. Craig Williams on Thursday, September 20, 2007 at 16:15. Comments Closed (0) |

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Sometimes you have to make an exception.  MITPC almost steadfastly refuses to publish news of bad lawyers, but one a kingpin falls, especially one who has made so much money on the businesses he so regularly criticized, karma has struck.

The King of Class Actions has plead guilty to conspiracy charges.



Printer friendly page Permalink Email to a friend Posted by J. Craig Williams on Wednesday, September 19, 2007 at 23:59. Comments Closed (0) |

Warm, Perhaps, But Not Hot Enough Yet

You'll be pleased to know that a California lawsuit against carmakers for contributing to greenhouse gases doesn't yet rise to the level of a public nuisance.  Or perhaps not.

Printer friendly page Permalink Email to a friend Posted by J. Craig Williams on Tuesday, September 18, 2007 at 00:03. Comments Closed (0) |

Forget That Bridge In Florida, China's Cornered The Market

If you want to "buy" land in China, you'll have to be very careful who you're buying it from and what you're buying. 

It just might belong to someone else.

But then again, if you want some swampland, step right over here...



Printer friendly page Permalink Email to a friend Posted by J. Craig Williams on Monday, September 17, 2007 at 00:09. Comments Closed (0) |

California's Newest Crime - TDWT - Teens Driving While Texting

The Governator Terminates Teens On The Telephone

You could say it rhymes with nitwit.  TWDT will be illegal in California next July 1.  If you're under 18, then you can't use anything electronic while driving, such as laptops, cellular phones and Game Boys, except perhaps the in-dash radio, and I'm not even sure about that.

It's so 1990s.

But wait, there's more from the Governor's office:  that deadline will also be the time when those of us over 18 must start using hands-free devices to make or receive cellular telephone calls.  Buy stock in your local phone carrier now.  Sales are about to increase.  Soon everyone will have those silly earpieces hanging from their ears.

The message from the Governor:  just hang up and drive.



Printer friendly page Permalink Email to a friend Posted by J. Craig Williams on Sunday, September 16, 2007 at 02:27. Comments Closed (0) |

Take A Moment And Enjoy Life - An Evening With Marilyn

If you're anywhere around San Diego, then it will be well worth your time to slip over to Anthology tonight for an evening with Marilyn Scott (link has sound, wonderful sound).  Her smooth vocals, passionate with a sultry, sensual warmth will surely stir your soul.  She's a great entertainer who's opened for Al Jarreau and sung with George Duke and members of the Yellowjackets. 

Marilyn's voice catapults you back in time to when folks dressed in tuxes, cocktail dresses and evening gowns and went to nightclubs to catch the best talent.  You won't be disappointed, and if you miss her tonight, you can always buy a CD.  I'm not the only one who agrees:  "Innocent of nothing [the title of her new CD], maybe, guilty of offering up a stellar new release, definitely." - SmoothJazz.com.



Printer friendly page Permalink Email to a friend Posted by J. Craig Williams on Saturday, September 15, 2007 at 16:19. Comments Closed (1) |

You Can Criticize Some Of The People Sometimes

Unless You're In Egypt And You Criticize The Government

Four tabloid editors in Egypt have been jailed for allegedly criticizing the President of Egypt, according to two watchdog groups.  According to one organization, one of the editors was sentenced to a year in prison and a monetary fine.  Watch what you write.



Printer friendly page Permalink Email to a friend Posted by J. Craig Williams on Friday, September 14, 2007 at 00:15. Comments Closed (0) |

Are Tattoos A Constitutionally Protected Form Of Self-expression?

For Now, Not In Hermosa Beach

Johnny Anderson can't practice his chosen profession of applying tattoos in Hermosa Beach, California because the City has outlawed tattoo parlors.  In this federal court complaint, his lawyer says, "a person may wear his heart on his sleeve, and the government may not prevent him from wearing it on his arm," despite a City Ordinance to the contrary.  Like all red-blooded Americans, he sued.

The Complaint starts out like a novel, citing tattoos found on the Alpine "Iceman," Egyptian and Nubian mummies and "the Greeks, ancient Germans, Gauls, Thracians and ancient Britons."  Wow.  I never knew tattoos had such a colorful history.

Anderson fast forwards this history to the U.S. Constitution and claims tattooing is a protected form of self-expression under the First Amendment, which the City of Hermosa Beach can't abridge under the Fourteenth Amendment, as "communicative, artistic and decorative."  Art, in a manner of speaking.  The federal judge will decide this one without a jury since it's a question of law, not fact.

The Complaint claims some twenty percent of us have tattoos, supposedly including a tiger on former Secretary of State George Schultz's backside.  I wonder how his lawyer will get that one into evidence

Tattoos were once fashionable among Egyptian women, and have been used by tribes, including the present-day Maori in New Zealand, who wear full-face tribal tattoos.  Tattoos have a dark side, too.  Nazi prisoners had them on their arms, and after World War II, they became almost solely the province of tawdry waterfront locations, sailors and disreputable women, sometimes referred to as "tramp stamps," and now largely the bane of parents.

Unless, of course, you already have one, you rebel.



Printer friendly page Permalink Email to a friend Posted by J. Craig Williams on Thursday, September 13, 2007 at 01:02. Comments Closed (0) |



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