May It Please The Court: Weblog of legal news and observations, including a quote of the day and daily updates

Skip To Content

MIPTC Author:

Bookstore:


Listed in Latino Who's Who, June 2014
 Attorney
Locations of visitors to this page

Creative Commons License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons License.


Quote of the Day - Women should be obscene and not heard. - Groucho Marx
Adjust font size: A A+ A++
Claim Your Profile on Avvo
There are 2033 Journal Items on 255 page(s) and you are on page number 166

Blogher, Blogyou, Blogme. Blogthere. Got That T-shirt, too.

In case you wonder where Wonder Woman went, wonder no longer. She's right here. As you can undoubtedly tell from the picture, I'm a WASP. Plus, I'm male. Which means, "I don't get it."

That said, if you're a blogher, then you will want to visit this site, and sign up.

Or, you can just be a girlie man and avoid the whole thing.

P.S. Here's an update. Keep those cards and letters coming.

Podcast 

Printer friendly page Permalink Email to a friend Posted by J. Craig Williams on Wednesday, April 20, 2005 at 14:06. Comments Closed (2) |

It's A Wonderful Life: Paul Was Appointed Postmaster

You may remember MIPTC's holiday story on Paul Pimental.
It was Christmastime last year, and Mr. Pimental - who had worked in the small, one-room post office in town for eight years - said goodbye to the patrons. He had apparently been passed over for the position of Postmaster. Paul had always been really nice to my Mother, frequently hand-delivering her mail to her before she had time to get to her box.

My Mother, a force in her own right, started a campaign in her small town on Cape Cod to have Mr. Pimental appointed as Postmaster of South Harwich. She took action, as only my Mother can.

Spending a long time on the telephone, she tracked down the person who made the decisions who to appoint as postmaster, Bill Peterson, and bent his ear. She started a write-in campaign and got a petition going. She told me about it, and I wrote a piece on Mr. Pimental on MIPTC. Other bloggers wrote in, too, as apparently many others did as a consequence of that story.

Well, it turns out that Mr. Pimental got his interview with the powers that be in the New England Post Office.

Although it would have been nice to write about at Christmas, it's welcome news nonetheless. Mr. Pimental has been appointed Postmaster. Paul related the good news to my Mother yesterday, and thanked her for her support. During the interview, Mr. Peterson read to Paul every letter that had been sent in, including the story that MIPTC ran. Mr. Peterson said he had never experienced such an outpouring of support.

Congratulations are due all around. Thanks to your support, South Harwich has a much-wanted Postmaster who's proud to do his job, and glad that it's a wonderful life.

Podcast 

Printer friendly page Permalink Email to a friend Posted by J. Craig Williams on Tuesday, April 19, 2005 at 13:03. Comments Closed (2) |

Are Lawyers Too Long-winded?

How many words does it take to regulate cabbage?

Podcast 

Printer friendly page Permalink Email to a friend Posted by J. Craig Williams on Monday, April 18, 2005 at 00:44. Comments Closed (0) |

Barbie Wonders If She Looks Like a Bratz

Unfair competition comes in all shapes and sizes. According to one website, it even comes in "chunky." Of course you know I'm referring to the latest flap between Bratz (link accompanied by loud music and lock 'back' control) and Barbie.

Bratz claims that My Scene Barbie (link accompanied by equally loud music) unfairly competes against Bratz. Turn down your computer volume and judge for yourself.

If you're confused by the two products, then there's a chance Bratz may win out over My Scene Barbie. The two companies will duke it out in federal court.

Barbie has been losing market share lately, in part due to Mattel's troubles with its Hot Wheels line, and in part due to competition from Bratz dolls.

Made by MGA, Bratz has previously generated litigation with Mattel, and the companies are fighting over what appears to be a decreasing market share.

When was the last time you thought about Cabbage Patch dolls?

Podcast 

Printer friendly page Permalink Email to a friend Posted by J. Craig Williams on Sunday, April 17, 2005 at 16:17. Comments Closed (1) |

Not My Kentucky Derby Pick

The Associated Press reported this week that Italian scientists have cloned a championship racehorse. The genetic material came from a retired championship gelding. Although the scientists said the cloned horse would not race, they did say he would be put out to stud in order to pass along his championship DNA.

I can imagine people in the horse world frantically scouring over old saddles, bridles, blankets, and victory sashes for stray hair, skin and other sources of genetic material from champions long since departed with the hopes of cloning Affirmed, Seattle Slew, or Secretariat. Could you imagine all “past” champions lined up across the starting gate? It would be a dream race. But that is the problem, it should always just be a “dream” race. If it doesn’t remain just a dream and such a race actually occurred why should we draw the line at racehorses? What would stop us from seeing a dream match-up between the 1927 Yankees and the 1902 Pittsburgh Pirates?

Please don’t misunderstand me. I realize that there may be incredible medical advances that result from cloning and encourage such research, but keep cloning away from sports whether it involves horses or humans lest I be unable to fall asleep dreaming about who would win, Jordan’s Bulls or Russell’s Celtics.

Podcast 

Printer friendly page Permalink Email to a friend Posted by Michel J. Ayer on Saturday, April 16, 2005 at 14:26. Comments Closed (0) |

Expensive SOx Compliance, Expensive Litigation Costs. What's Your Solution?

You thought lawyers were expensive. How about accountants?

Complying with SOx has proven to be too much for many small companies. According to the Albany Times Union article linked above, Lincoln Logs, Ltd. has been paying almost $240,000 per year for accountants and compliance with Sarbanes-Oxley reporting requirements.

As a solution, Lincoln Logs will offer its shareholders a reverse stock split to trade 500 shares of stock for one, reducing the number of shareholders to 132. The company will then fall below the SEC's radar screen, and eliminate the expensive accountants. It's a welcome relief for the company that posts an income of $15 million per year.

Now if we could just figure out a way to accomplish the same thing in litigation. Well, how about it? What can lawyers do to lessen litigation costs that can cost the same or much more in a standard litigation matter?

There are a number of options. Insurance, for one. Unfortunately, that won't pay all the costs, and it won't cover the typical breach of contract cases. Another option is mediation or arbitration, but with $600/hour private judges to pay in addition to the lawyers, that gets expensive, too. Early settlement? Possibly, however, litigants worry that they're leaving too much money on the table and not fully exploring what happened in the case.

There's apparently no ready solution. What are your thoughts?

Podcast 

Printer friendly page Permalink Email to a friend Posted by J. Craig Williams on Friday, April 15, 2005 at 09:43. Comments Closed (2) |

New York Times Site Cites Bloggers

The New York Times has caught the wave. Now, it's annotated with blogs that cite to it. Hat tip: Depraved Librarian.

Cite away, and have the NYT cite you.

Podcast 

Printer friendly page Permalink Email to a friend Posted by J. Craig Williams on Thursday, April 14, 2005 at 00:53. Comments Closed (0) |

What's The Statute Of Limitations For Retirement?

Disclaimer here: I'm nearing 50 (if you really want to know, send me an email), and this headline: For lawyers, 60 is the new 50 caught me off guard. Somebody thought 50 was old?

Sure, when I was a kid, it was "Don't trust anyone over 30." But I always thought lawyers could practice until late in life, and I'm glad to see that it's apparently true.

The headline above comes from a story written by Ellen Rosen of the New York Times, and she points out in her article that most large law firms require mandatory retirement at 60, and some extend it to 63 or 67. One of our lawyers is in his 70's, well beyond that time limit. Rosen cites several examples of lawyers who found new challenges and practically new careers after 60.

Our experience is similar. We find a tremendous value in seniority, and welcome the guidance that comes from seeing practically everything that law has to offer. There are plenty of other older lawyers out there, too.

Should law firms even have a set age for mandatory retirement? What is your law firm's experience?


Podcast 

Printer friendly page Permalink Email to a friend Posted by J. Craig Williams on Wednesday, April 13, 2005 at 23:25. Comments Closed (0) |



Page:  << Prev  1  2  3  4  5  6  7  8  9  10  11  12  13  14  15  16  17  18  19  20  21  22  23  24  25  26  27  28  29  30  31  32  33  34  35  36  37  38  39  40  41  42  43  44  45  46  47  48  49  50  51  52  53  54  55  56  57  58  59  60  61  62  63  64  65  66  67  68  69  70  71  72  73  74  75  76  77  78  79  80  81  82  83  84  85  86  87  88  89  90  91  92  93  94  95  96  97  98  99  100  101  102  103  104  105  106  107  108  109  110  111  112  113  114  115  116  117  118  119  120  121  122  123  124  125  126  127  128  129  130  131  132  133  134  135  136  137  138  139  140  141  142  143  144  145  146  147  148  149  150  151  152  153  154  155  156  157  158  159  160  161  162  163  164  165  166 167  168  169  170  171  172  173  174  175  176  177  178  179  180  181  182  183  184  185  186  187  188  189  190  191  192  193  194  195  196  197  198  199  200  201  202  203  204  205  206  207  208  209  210  211  212  213  214  215  216  217  218  219  220  221  222  223  224  225  226  227  228  229  230  231  232  233  234  235  236  237  238  239  240  241  242  243  244  245  246  247  248  249  250  251  252  253  254  255  Next >>

Back to top.