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Quote of the Day - A military operation involves deception. Even though you are competent, appear to be incompetent. Though effective, appear to be ineffective. - Sun-tzu (~400 BC), The Art of War. Strategic Assessments
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Submarining Base Closures Based On Contamination Cleanup Costs

Base closures are battlegrounds of their own. While they're certainly big issues for discussion, MIPTC wants to focus on one.

As a young cadet, I spent a summer learning how to sail across from the sub base in Groton, in New London, on the Thames River.

We learned the rules of the road of sailing, one of which required powered vessels to give way to sailboats. Learning in 12-foot dingys, we thought we held sway over submarines. It didn't work. One cadet ended up with his dingy smashed into the conning tower, and as he looked up to the stunned submarine captain, he could only muster "Permission to come aboard, sir?" Subs, it turned out, were entitled to the right of way over a sailboat because even though powered (sail almost always trumps power), the subs' movement was restricted in a tight channel and couldn't stop or turn easily, whereas 12-foot dingys could.

Shortly, however, that story will not repeat itself, since subs won't be maneuvering up and down the river. The shocking aspect of the base closure, however, isn't so much missing subs, but the contamination left behind.

So much so that the government predicts the Groton property won't be able to be used for virtually anything (see the last line of the story from the last link above). Beyond MIPTC's known penchant for making the government responsible to clean up its own mess (since the government requires businesses to clean up their contamination), this closure just doesn't make sense.

Think about it.

The Pentagon wants to close a base that ultimately can't (or won't) be used for anything else.

Why not just keep it open?

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Printer friendly page Permalink Email to a friend Posted by J. Craig Williams on Tuesday, May 31, 2005 at 00:52 Comments Closed (0) |
 
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