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Quote of the Day - Illegal aliens have always been a problem in the United States. Ask any Indian. - Robert Orben
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330 Years Later, We Can Fish In The Middle Of The Lake

In Woostah, where I was born, my dad used to tell me about a lake called Chargoggagoggmanchaugagoggchaubunagungamaugg, in a small town called Webster, Massachusetts, near Connecticut. I could never get the beginning, but somehow managed to say the end of it, something like gog-cha-bunga-mog. It's a Nipmuc Indian phrase he translated as, "You fish on your side of the lake; I'll fish on my side of the lake; and no one fishes the middle of the lake."

Somehow, Bahston never got that lesson. For the past 330 years, the City has had a law on its books that prevented Indians from entering the City. It stemmed from a battle between English settlers and Native Indian residents, long since forgotten.

But not by some. Unity - Journalists of Color, Inc. wanted to hold a conference in the City, but members of the group are Native Indians. Even though the law has not been recently enforced, the group protested - and won.

Boston now welcomes the Indians who were its first residents, and the convention will proceed as originally planned. We've taken a big step forward from 1675, now haven't we?

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Printer friendly page Permalink Email to a friend Posted by J. Craig Williams on Saturday, May 21, 2005 at 00:45 Comments Closed (1) |
 
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