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Quote of the Day - Thou art the Mars of malcontents. - William Shakespeare
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Texas Messes With Mars Mineral Rights

Texas is a big state. So big, in fact, that if you want to file a mining claim, you can, as you would expect. Not only in Texas, but also on Mars. That's right. In Texas. For mining and mineral claims on Mars. You know, the planet Mars.

In fact, you can get licensed in Texas for just about anything.

So it shouldn't surprise you that Texas allows people to record mining and mineral claims for other, celestial bodies. Don't mess with Texas, right?

If Texans are batty enough to give people a legal basis to sue NASA for trespassing on those mining claims, then this headline shouldn't surprise you either:

"Man Who Represented Himself Appeals Competence of Attorney."

Go ahead. Read that headline again. Even once more, if it just seems too incredible to be true. Yep, your eyes do not deceive you - you got it - an in pro per Defendant claims that he shouldn't have been able to represent himself, and because the judge allowed him to, he should be given a retrial.

So what's the connection with Texas? According to the Law.com link above, our hero Defendant Thomas P. Budnick "tried to file and peddle mining claims in such diverse places as George's Bank, the asteroid belt, Mars and the moons of Jupiter. After trying several states without success, he finally persuaded Texas authorities to accept his astral mineral rights claims in 1984."

I don't even know what "astral mineral rights" are, but I know I want some. Especially if somebody's buying them.

But let's get back to our hero. Right after he got out of a mental hospital, he was accused of giving poison, otherwise used to polish meteorites, to one of his friends - in a beer. His appeal is from the lesser of two charges, assault with a dangerous weapon. He was acquitted of the primary charge of attempted poisoning. Not bad for a guy who defended himself. The lesser charge resulted in a two-year sentence, which is now on appeal.

Here's the kicker: Brudnick gets out of jail this summer. Somehow it all makes sense, doesn't it?

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Printer friendly page Permalink Email to a friend Posted by J. Craig Williams on Friday, April 08, 2005 at 00:00 Comments Closed (0) |
 
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