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Quote of the Day - Obviously, the arrogance of my own nature in regards to other people's work would suggest that I think I'm talented. - John Hurt
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We Can Pay Any Punitive Damages You Can Award

Hats off to my former partner, Dan Callahan of Callahan & Blaine, who just pulled down a $934 million dollar victory. The news hasn't made it to their website yet, but it is in the print version of today's Los Angeles Daily Journal (right most column, and third story down on this internet page).

Dan represented a medical equipment manufacturer, Beckman Coulter, and Gary Waldron of Waldron & Olsen and Scott Farrell of Call, Jensen & Farrell (I couldn't find either of their sites) represented Dovatron, whose parent is Flextronics. Supposedly trading was halted after the verdict, by it appears that the stock is still being traded, although it's fallen 4.73% at the time of this post. Not surprisingly, Waldron nor Farrell returned calls to the Daily Journal. Dan, of course, played to the paper.

According to the article, "The jury was instructed - at the behest of Flextronic's counsel, according to Callahan - that the company was capable of paying any punitive award it may deliver. 'They stipulated they could pay any punitive damage allowed by law,' he said. 'I believe that tactic backfired on them. Their rationale was they did not want to expose their financial records in any more depth to the jury, but I believe it gave the jury a sense of arrogance and lack of remorse.'"

In order to get to that little tidbit, you have to wade through the entire article. I don't think I would have put that revelation at the end of the article.

That revelation is $850 million of the verdict. Arrogance costs a lot these days.

Printer friendly page Permalink Email to a friend Posted by J. Craig Williams on Thursday, September 25, 2003 at 11:23 Comments Closed (0) |
 
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