May It Please The Court: Weblog of legal news and observations, including a quote of the day and daily updates

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Quote of the Day - You are a product of your environment. So choose the environment that will best develop you toward your objective. Analyze your life in terms of its environment. Are the things around you helping you toward success - or are they holding you back? - W. Clement Stone
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Both Sides Turn To The Courts To Litigate Environmental Laws

The epic battle over property set-asides for endangered species is about to come to a head. Late last year, the Bush administration changed regulations to allow development to move forward if there were late discoveries of endangered species on the property.

Environmental groups fought back, and the dispute has now spilled over into the courts. Not once, but twice.

The suits argue that the critical habitat designations do little to save species, but drive housing costs though the roof.

The first suit seeks to force the USFWS to change critical habitat designations for 27 plant and animal species and the second suit seeks to force the agency to change habitat areas for 15 vernal pool species. PLF filed the two lawsuits on behalf of associations representing California family farmers and ranchers, home builders, and business owners throughout the state.

The environmental battle is being fought on other fronts, too.

The Center for Biological Diversity filed a third suit yesterday challenging the Bush Administration's new regulations governing logging, mining, and grazing. This suit argues that the regulation prevents forest planning decisions from being subjected to judicial review by granting unlimited discretion to local forest rangers. The suit would affect 192 million acres of National Forests in 42 states, Puerto Rico, and the Virgin Islands.

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Printer friendly page Permalink Email to a friend Posted by J. Craig Williams on Thursday, March 31, 2005 at 10:14 Comments Closed (0) |
 
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