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Quote of the Day - Americans are the only people in the world known to me whose status anxiety prompts them to advertise their college and university affiliations in the rear window of their automobiles. - Paul Fussel
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Your Opinion Please: Ads In RSS Feeds? What Do You Want?

Bill Gratsch over at Blawg.org posits the question of how to develop an acceptable model to include ads in RSS feeds.

MIPTC is struggling with that issue, too. Wired notes that there are a number of companies and weblogs already using ads in RSS feeds, including Weblogs, Inc., the parent company of Engadget. The Wired article has this quote:

"Jason Calacanis, founder of Weblogs, said in an e-mail that most serious blog readers use RSS regularly and that it makes sense to start advertising on feeds along with blog websites. 'Visiting the website is dating; getting a daily e-mail is going steady -- but subscribing to an RSS feed, well, that is like getting married to a news source," he said. "It's really the highest commitment you can make.' "

Well, hello there all you RSS feed readers. I never knew.

Kidding aside, it's coming. That last link is for a company that will place your ad in an RSS feed. The other end of the spectrum is ready. Or is it? Perhaps it's just as simple as the Delete button.

Here's a short case study, in case you're interested in how RSS ads fared.

The Law.com folks are working on the issue, and as I understand it, struggling with how to place those ads so that you're not offended. Frankly, the big ad on the top of this page is a little much, but I've started to get used to it. Not many of you have objected, figuring it comes with the territory these days.

But on one hand, some of you come directly to the page, and for those of you who are repeat readers of this page, you know what you're getting. RSS feed readers, on the other hand, get the content fed to their desktops.

I'm sensitive to the fact that you allow me to visit you. Robin Good offered some good advice, seven points in all, about how to handle ads in RSS feeds.

MIPTC wants your opinion before ads start showing up in our RSS feeds.

Let me give you some parameters, first, though, so you know what we're looking at. At one end of the spectrum are the same, rich-media ads like the one on the top of this page. Frankly, I think that type of an ad is a mistake, but I'm willing to consider them.

The other end of the spectrum is the National Public Radio model (even if they don't want you to link to their site).

You know: "Brought to you by the John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation"-style advertisement. A simple, text-based note at the end of the RSS feed.

MIPTC would probably even do the same thing at the end of its podcasts and soon-to-return Vlawgcasts (videocasts).

Now it's your turn to vote. Comment below or call 206-833-3088 and leave a message. MIPTC will post your audio comment in the comment section below.

Let me know. I'd rather you tell me now than click the delete button later.

Thanks for your time.

Podcast 

Printer friendly page Permalink Email to a friend Posted by J. Craig Williams on Saturday, February 19, 2005 at 11:29 Comments Closed (2) |
 
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