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Quote of the Day - No. - Amy Carter, (President Jimmy Carter's daughter) when asked by a reporter if she had any message for the children of America.
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Perry Mason for AG and Madonna for Secretary of State

Maybe Bush should reconsider his nomination of Condoleezza Rice. Excuse me, I meant Dr. Rice.

I think he may want to consider Madonna. You think I'm joking? Not at all. I'm completely serious.

Right before Thanksgiving, I read that Madonna had expressed her views on terrorism.

After all, Madonna did attend the University of Michigan, where she studied ... dance. Oh, did I forget to mention that she dropped out? But, she did graduate from high school. Now I'm not here to offend Madonna fans. I enjoy some of her music. Neither I am here to offend college dropouts or high school graduates. Or, for that matter, anyone.

I'm just trying to make a singular point about why we listen to celebrities comment on things other than their celebrity or their chosen field of expertise.

In fact, I could have picked any one of a number of celebrities who make political comments. Admittedly, no one is immune from gaffes.

But I wanted to stick with celebrity comments. You can check the politicians, if you'd like.

Before we do, however, let's take two slight detours just to make sure I've got my head screwed on straight. First of all, there are exceptions to the rule - we already have celebrity politicians, some revered, some TV stars turned Congressmen, and even a Senator turned TV star and movie star (Ok, he was a movie star first).

Second, I don't think for a minute that my comments on the arts performed by celebrities would be reported in worldwide media, despite whatever education I may have. [Even though I did play the Stage Manager in Thorton Wilder’s play Our Town in 11th grade, a role I seem to continue in today]. For that matter, think back to how many politicians you’ve heard or read about expressing their views on the arts. Stumped? How about the other way around? Probably no shortage on the latter.

The lines have blurred between celebrities and politicians. But that doesn't mean the line between celebrities and politics should blur, too. Somewhere along that second line though, we seem to have let it.

Otherwise, why would the BBC have reported Madonna's comments? Are the Brits just as star struck as we seem to be?

The question I pose is whether we should lend credence to celebrity comments on issues outside the scope of their expertise? Should we even listen?

If you agree that perhaps we should not, then ask yourself this question: what does that tell us about journalists, news reporters, editors and even networks that print, reprint and broadcast this stuff? Do they have real questions or just fluff?

Or, more likely, should we just follow the media money?

Here’s another way to look at it. Could Perry Mason really practice law?

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Printer friendly page Permalink Email to a friend Posted by J. Craig Williams on Friday, November 26, 2004 at 17:13 Comments Closed (3) |
 
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