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Quote of the Day - While you're saving your face, you're losing your ass. - President Lyndon Johnson
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How Much For That Lawyer In the Window?

How much do good lawyers cost? Well, that's a loaded question, and just like everything else in the law, there's more than one answer. To begin with, we all know that lawyers generally get paid one of two ways: hourly or contingency. Unless, of course, a lawyer works pro bono, and then it's free.

Hourly rates generally run between $80 and $1,000, depending on location, education, experience, and track record, among other things.

But some lawyers' rates can be astronomical, and some cases can cost the GNP of a small country.

Take, for example, the battle between South Carolina's rural schools and its legislature. So far, over the course of ten years, lawyers have racked up over $10,000,000. The rural schools have been classified as poor. And they can afford those fees?

Compare that to the little (ok, not so little) York, PA. They can't fix their potholes, buy fire equipment, and even replace toilet paper rolls. But, they want to spend $37,000 for a lawyer for the City Council.

Then there's the Exxon Valdez case, where the 60 winning law firms earned over $1.3 billion.

When you win, your lawyer is worth it. But usually, one side loses in each case.

Is there a solution to this question?

Printer friendly page Permalink Email to a friend Posted by J. Craig Williams on Monday, September 20, 2004 at 12:36 Comments Closed (2) |
 
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