May It Please The Court: Weblog of legal news and observations, including a quote of the day and daily updates

Skip To Content

MIPTC Author:

Bookstore:


Listed in Latino Who's Who, June 2014
 Attorney
Categories [more]
General (1982)
Lawyer 2 Lawyer (283)
Latest Blogs
This Month's Posts [more]
S
M
T
W
T
F
S
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
27
28
29
30
31
Links of Interest [more]
Locations of visitors to this page

Creative Commons License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons License.


Quote of the Day - We can be absolutely certain only about things we do not understand. - Eric Hoffer
Adjust font size: A A+ A++
Claim Your Profile on Avvo

Red Wine Like Toxic Contamination?

You spill red wine on your white carpet. What do you do? You get a cleaner out, and go to work. At some point, though, no more wine will come out of the carpet, no matter how hard you scrub and how much cleaner you use.

But you have to get the wine out before someone sees it. What do you do now?

Options range from using a stronger cleaner to just cutting the stain out and replacing the carpet.

Same thing for toxic contamination in the ground. There's a theory called the Dual Equilibrium Desorption Model, which was derived from a unique premise: only a fraction of contaminants in soil desorb, while the remaining fraction remains tightly bound. By assuming two different desorption terms, the DED model is the only mathematical model that realistically quantifies the release of organic compounds from soils.

The DED model was developed from more than 10 years of research at Rice University. It requires only simple and readily available parameters and has been proven to be much more accurate in quantifying desorption, according to Steve Figgins at Brown & Caldwell. Currently adopted desorption models significantly overestimate desorption of organic compounds such as BTEX and chlorinated solvents. This new method allows for better planning and decision making to avoid more extensive/costly remediation. Here's the chart that explains it graphically.

Now you can know when to stop trying to remove toxic contaminants from the soil, and switch cleanup options.

Want a pinot noir with that white carpet?

Printer friendly page Permalink Email to a friend Posted by J. Craig Williams on Friday, February 06, 2004 at 10:48 Comments Closed (0) |
 
Share Link