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Quote of the Day - Experience is the worst teacher. It always gives the test first and the instruction afterward. - Unknown
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So You Want To Be A Lawyer? Here Are Some Stats:

From the Law School Admission Council:  last year, 515,000 applications were submitted to law schools.  Approximately 140,000 LSAT exams were administered (there are repeat test takers in this number), required by the approximate 195 law schools for all applicants.  Some 84,000 students completed their applications to law school.  55,500 of those students were accepted into law school, about sixty-five percent.

On a regular basis Kaplan Test Prep and Admissions (a division of worldwide education services provider, Kaplan, Inc.) surveys its students about a variety of relevant topics.  In this particular case, Kaplan surveyed about 2,000 students who took the December LSAT.

With the elections this year, how many of those 55,500 law students will get involved in politics?  Who's looking for money?

Glen Stohr, the director of pre-law programs at Kaplan Test Prep and Admissions, says "law school remains a breeding ground for future politicians - but a significant gender gap remains."  Forty-two percent of LSAT takers reported they will "definitely" or "probably" run for political office, a breakdown by gender reveals that among male students, the figure jumps to 52 percent - versus a drop to 34 percent among female students.

Seventy three percent of LSAT takers said high income potential was a "very important" or "important" factor in their decision to attend law school.

The first number surprised me, but the second one didn't.  After all, the range of debt of law students after they graduate can run from $80K to $140K.  But then again, the top starting salaries for the upper one percent of students at the top of their class graduating from the top law schools can reach $160K.

With that kind of debt, it's tough to imagine anyone going into politics. 

________________

Disclosure here:  Kaplan Test Prep and Admissions invited me to interview Mr. Stohr, in part because its sister company, Kaplan Publishing, is publishing my upcoming book.  More details and a proper announcement later, but in the meantime, it seemed like good material for a post.  Mr. Stohr is a lawyer, having graduated from ASU law school and both designs test prep courses and teaches them for Kaplan.

Printer friendly page Permalink Email to a friend Posted by J. Craig Williams on Thursday, March 13, 2008 at 00:07 Comments Closed (0) |
 
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