May It Please The Court: Weblog of legal news and observations, including a quote of the day and daily updates

Skip To Content

MIPTC Author:

Bookstore:


Listed in Latino Who's Who, June 2014
 Attorney
Categories [more]
General (1982)
Lawyer 2 Lawyer (283)
Latest Blogs
This Month's Posts [more]
S
M
T
W
T
F
S
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
27
28
29
30
31
Links of Interest [more]
Locations of visitors to this page

Creative Commons License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons License.


Quote of the Day - An Indian tribe is sovereign to the extent that the U.S. permits it to be sovereign. - Russell Smith
Adjust font size: A A+ A++
Claim Your Profile on Avvo

Indian Tribe Files Suit Over 13-year Delay In Acting On Gaming Application With 60-day Required Response

The fine folks over at Courthouse News bring us this tidbit from their files:  A Complaint filed by the Seminole Indians against the Secretary of the Interior. 

By law the Secretary of the Interior has 60 days to act on an Indian tribe's application for a gaming license.  The Seminole Tribe of Florida claims several secretaries of the Interior have failed to act on their application for over 13 years.

That's a lot longer than 60 days, even if your office doesn't come furnished with a calendar.  Apparently, the Secretary of Interior lacked the funding to purchase not only the paper to write back to the Tribe, but also the means to track the days and years that were ticking by.

That's the government for you. 

While MIPTC understands Indian law, doesn't it make sense that if you are a sovereign nation, you don't need to ask permission?  But that's just me.

Printer friendly page Permalink Email to a friend Posted by J. Craig Williams on Tuesday, March 06, 2007 at 00:21 Comments Closed (0) |
 
Share Link