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Quote of the Day - I never went to a John Wayne movie to find a philosophy to live by or to absorb a profound message. I went for the simple pleasure of spending a couple of hours seeing the bad guys lose. - Mike Royko
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Can You Curse At The Airport?

(Even Though You May Have Good Reason)

MIPTC doesn't recommend it, even though I was a sailor at one time and can keep up with the best of them.

Curse, that is.

It seems that Elizabeth Venable, a Ph.D. candidate at UC Riverside (in dance history and theory, of all things), was leaving the baggage area at the John Wayne Airport and turned the air blue.  A nearby Sheriff's Deputy heard the foul language, and concerned about the effect on nearby children, cautioned the woman to mind her tongue, as my Grandmother would say.  Venable instead asked an expletive-laden question of the Deputy, and was promptly cited for a misdemeanor.

More properly, for violating an Orange County law that bans "disorderly, obnoxious [or] indecent" behavior at the airport.  MIPTC was unaware that we actually had a separate set of laws that apply at the airport, but apparently there's more trouble down there than I knew.

Perhaps not too surprising, she was none too happy with the misdemeanor charge, so she's fighting back with a civil suit alleging a violation of her First Amendment right of free speech, and using the same argument to defend against the criminal charge.

According to the LA Times, "legal experts" are conflicted over whether she'll win.  The problem, though, is that the Times asked two laywers for an opinion, and then came to the conclusion that lawyers were conflicted.  Anytime you ask two lawyers for an opinion, you'll get four, so there should have been no surprise.

MIPTC predicts she'll likely lose at the trial court, lose again at the local court of appeal, and then win a reversal at the Supreme Court.  The first two, remember, are here in The OC, and we understand good manners.  Not to say that the Supremes don't; it's just that things are a bit different up there in Sacramento.

Printer friendly page Permalink Email to a friend Posted by J. Craig Williams on Thursday, March 01, 2007 at 00:58 Comments Closed (0) |
 
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