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Quote of the Day - I've always felt those articles somehow reveal more about the writers than they do about me. - Marilyn Monroe
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You're Kidding!!!!!! It's Not True?????

I normally don't go off on a rant here, but (choose the one on individual responsibility, and you'll get the idea), we've become blind email recipients who automatically forward whatever shows up as if it were the gospel handed down on two tablets.

News flash: not all emails are true. This MSN article features the top nine email hoaxes. As many of you know, of all of them, I would be most tempted to fall for the $250 Nieman Marcus chocolate chip recipe email. You know, the one that says some lady got charged $250 for the recipe, but wants revenge and is giving it away, and you just have to pay shipping and handling. I love really good chocolate chip cookies.

But, it's a hoax. I was so disappointed. Until I went to the Neiman Marcus website, and discovered that they've actually published the recipe. For free. No hoax, no kidding.

Of people that were bilked last year and not embarrased enough to report it, the average individual lost $468.00. Apparently, the Nigeran money offer is the scam most fall for. To quote MSN, "There is a billion, kazillion dollars in an account here that rightfully belongs to my family and my people. Due to some horrid-bloody military coup in which my entire family, several accountants and various goats lost their lives, I cannot reach this money. But you, an American who has never heard of my country, can march right into the corner branch of God-Forsaken-War-Torn-East-of-Nowhere-Africa and deposit this money right into your fat American bank account. For your trouble, I'll give you a few million off the top -- because what's a few million between confidential best friends who have never actually even heard of one another?"

Such a deal. Where do I sign up? Oh, it's not true? Say it ain't so. I could use a few million. Even the Secret Service issued a warning about the scam, as well as the Internet Fraud Complaint Center.

Email is not the only scam out there, as you undoubtedly know. So too for securities, commission-free trades, and surprise of all surprises, telemarketers. Has the No-call list gone into effect yet? I can't wait.

My all-time favorite, though, are those people who feel compelled to warn me about computer virus hoaxes. Don't fall prey to these emails, either. Check out Symantec's security hoax page before you click on forward in order to save my computer. It's one less piece of email I don't need (huh?).

By the way, Congress is passing a law this session, and it's titled: If it's too good to be true, it isn't. Would it help if I put five exclamation marks after that statement to make it appear true?????

Printer friendly page Permalink Email to a friend Posted by J. Craig Williams on Wednesday, November 19, 2003 at 08:14 Comments Closed (1) |
 
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