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Quote of the Day - I would change policy, bring back natural grass and nickel beer. Baseball is the belly-button of our society. Straighten out baseball, and you straighten out the rest of the world. - Bill Lee, Boston Red Sox pitcher
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Who Owns Baseball Statistics?

Earlier this year, MIPTC reported that CBC Marketing & Distribution sued Major League Baseball over the ownership of fantasy baseball statistics.  At the time of my post, MIPTC cried foul and predicted MLB would lose.  You can read the Complaint here.  CBC wanted to use the statistics in its fantasy baseball leagues, and MLB wanted royalties for the use of those statistics.  Not surprisingly, CBC didn't want to pay, and sued to determine whether it had to.

Final score?  CBC 1, MLB 0.  That's right, Major League Baseball lost the ability to control the statistics its players generate while playing real games.  The court ruled that the statistics are part of the public domain and not the property of MLB.  Spokespersons for MLB vowed an appeal, so the game isn't quite over yet.  We're sure to get into extra innings on this one.  US District Court Magistrate Judge Mary Medler issued a 49-page opinion, granting summary judgment for CBC in the case, fully entitled:  C.B.C. Distribution and Marketing, Inc. v. Major League Baseball Advanced Media, LP, Case no. 4:05CV00252MLM (ED MO August 8, 2006).

Infamy or Praise likewise predicted the win, but wants royalties for the prediction.  In his Trademark Blog, Marty Schwimmer noted that the opinion also cited CBC's First Amendment rights as a reason for the win.

MIPTC reads the score this way:  strike two for baseball, with the third to follow shortly after the appeal. 

Printer friendly page Permalink Email to a friend Posted by J. Craig Williams on Tuesday, August 15, 2006 at 13:36 Comments Closed (0) |
 
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