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MIPTC's Travel Report From Scotland - The Hero Edition

First started yesterday, MIPTC is going to cover some Scottish and Welsh history from onsite during my travels through these two countries.  If this is your first post, please scroll down to April 2, 2006, and start there, reading in chronological order.

 

Scots are famous for their thrift and independence, and those traits are likely where we got some of ours in the states.  Indeed, one famous Scot was reported as having said, "I'm from Scotland; I don't need to ask for my independence."  Other Scotsmen follow the same example.

 

Paul Revere was a famous American of Scottish heritage who didn't have a hard time renewing his country's dislike of the English when he made that famous midnight ride to warn the Colonialists of an impending English attack.  This dislike of the English goes back almost to the beginning of the relations between the two peoples. 

 

We're most familiar with one of those struggles from Braveheart, and Scotland has a well-known monument dedicated to a native hero, Sir William Wallace, who was a giant among men not only for his leadership and victories, but also his 6'6" stature.  The monument commemorates not only a number of  Scotland's heroes, of which Wallace is certainly one, but also one of the only major victories against the English in the battle at Stirling Bridge against the English General Walsingham in 1297.

 

Wallace's 66" sword is enshrined in the tall stone monument, which also features a sizable stone sculpture of Mel Gibson's depiction of Wallace.  Guides at the monument are quick to point out, however, that Wallace's actual Claymore sword is so big that Gibson could not pull it from the scabbard on his back.  I'm not sure I could have either, at only 6'1", but that too is another story.

 

Stay tuned for the continued report on Scotland tomorrow.

Printer friendly page Permalink Email to a friend Posted by J. Craig Williams on Monday, April 03, 2006 at 14:44 Comments Closed (0) |
 
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