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Quote of the Day - Presidents come and go, but the Supreme Court goes on forever. - William Howard Taft
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MIPTC's Book Review: Advice and Consent - The Politics Of Judicial Appointments

We've just been through three major rounds of judicial nominations that led to two U.S. Supreme Court appointments, with more federal district and appellate court openings coming our way every day.  A relatively new book, Advice and Consent, from Oxford University Press takes a thorough look at the process, politics and presidential aspects of court appointments.  Witty yet well-informed, Professors Epstein and Segal give an insight into the whys and wherefores of federal judge appointments.

Congress and Courts share the limelight in this book with the backdrop of Washington politics.  If you watched and read about the appointments of Roberts and Alito and the nomination of Miers wondering how it all works, this book explains it quickly and concisely.  This book will remain timely as long as we have a Constitution, three branches of government and two main parties in the Senate.   You don't have to be a lawyer to read and learn from it.

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Printer friendly page Permalink Email to a friend Posted by J. Craig Williams on Saturday, February 25, 2006 at 20:56 Comments Closed (0) |
 
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